What Happens When Lawyers Need Lawyers: 5 Different Scenarios

The justice system is rife with complexity, and attorneys often need lawyers of their own to address intricate legal issues. There are several instances that mandate the need for external representation, and being one’s own lawyer often amounts to hours of unpaid labor. Below are five of the most common kinds of cases that necessitate the need for lawyers to employ other lawyers.
1. Disabled Rights

Just like in any other career, daily work can be severely interrupted by illness or injury. During instances of unexpected disabilities, attorneys need to have a proxy to ensure their duties are fulfilled. Unfortunately, a lot of bureaucratic effort is involved in the simple process of transferring cases, so incapacitated lawyers must have a reliable agent on hand. These parties can handle all basic filings, and they will stand in during most hearings. Whenever possible, they are also tasked with acquiring monetary compensation for the lawyer that is out of work.
2. Confidentiality Preservation

The best lawyers never shy away from controversy, so their need for privacy can be higher than most other occupations. Certain gag orders can limit the participation of attorneys that have been previously in a case’s progression, which means secondary representation is required. Groundbreaking lawyers may also seek counsel when their trailblazing methods land them in hot water. It is much easier to plead Fifth Amendment rights when another lawyer is doing all of the talking.
3. Remote Representation

Occupational demands often dictate that lawyers operate within multiple precincts and jurisdictions. Most of the time, these areas are closely located; however, some attorneys have offices in several parts of the country. If scheduled courtroom appearances are destined to overlap, another attorney may be sent to handle processions in the absence of a summoned party. If physical presence is not needed for a hearing, then a lawyer can skip it entirely. The whole affair can be left to an underling or intern.
4. Malpractice Protection

Because there are endless challenges associated with legalese mazes, errors are bound to happen on occasion during even the most professional attorney’s careers. To stave off damaging malpractice litigation, it is wise to have a specialized defense lawyer on retainer at all times. A sterling reputation can be maintained by employing a hawkish ally to oversee risky courtroom strategies.
5. Post-Disbarment Trials

Banishment from law practice closes the door on working in the courtroom, but it opens the door for a ton of new legal problems. Reinstatement is a nearly impossible journey, and the rules depend on regional codes and specific infractions. Usually, a lengthy time period must also pass before reentry will even be considered. This range typically encompasses five years. This is a huge window for potential run-ins with the law, and the best bet for withstanding any court procedure is through outside help. Judges are characteristically harsh when it comes to disgraced lawyers, so top-notch representation is the safest route.

The examples detailed above refer to very specific instances of lawyers serving lawyers, but there are general causes for the layered practice too. For example, prosecutors have a tendency to make lousy defenders, so these workers have to reach across the aisle to receive aid from their inherently opposite counterparts. Ultimately, every case is unique!